YouTuber claims batteries blew up in three Samsung smartphones due to the recent UK heatwave

A well-known tech reviewer, who was one many people struggling in a heatwave that gripped the UK last week, claims three of his Samsung phones exploded due to the intense heat.

Arun Maini told DailyMail.com that the batteries in his Samsung Galaxy S6, Galaxy Note 8 and Galaxy S10 were three times the size, which pushed the back covers off each handset, while none of the more than 600 smartphones in his collection were phased.

The YouTube star is not the only one with a damaged Samsung, as several people in the UK mentioned they experienced the same issue, with one user saying it happened to his Samsung that has been sitting in the cupboard untouched for awhile.

The recent events echo that of the 2016 Samsung Galaxy Note 7 that were found to spontaneously exploded and have been found fault of starting at least 112 fires.

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A YouTuber, who reviews tech, shared images on Twitter of three Samsung smartphones that he said were damaged by the heatwave – the batteries exploded due to swelling

The UK saw record high temperatures for more than a week, with the highest reaching 104 degrees on July 19.

And it seems like the heat was too much for even Samsung smartphones to bear.

Another tech reviewer, Zaryab Khan, commented on Maini’s tweet, saying he experienced a similar issue.

‘Can confirm the same. Recently my Note 10+, Z fold 2 & S20 batteries got swollen,’ reads Khan’s tweet.

Another user said it happened to his Samsung that has been sitting in the cupboard untouched for awhile

Another user said it happened to his Samsung that has been sitting in the cupboard untouched for awhile

The smartphone looks like it was split in half, which was caused by a exploding battery, the user claims

The smartphone looks like it was split in half, which was caused by a exploding battery, the user claims

‘It never happened to any other phones in the collection no matter how old. Only Samsung devices.’

Some speculate the heat is different in the UK, as one Twitter user said houses are made to trap heat, similar to an oven and this could have resulted in the batteries overheating.

Hussam also shared his thoughts, noting that ‘Samsung did not test their phones under heat conditions.’ He claims to live in Saudi Arabia.

The news of exploding Samsung smartphones may remind many of the Galaxy Note 7 fiasco that highlighted the challenges of packing more power into much thinner phones that were rushed to market in August 2016 in a bid to beat out Apple’s new iPhone.

Another tech reviewer, Zaryab Khan, commented on Maini's tweet, saying he experienced a similar issue

Another tech reviewer, Zaryab Khan, commented on Maini’s tweet, saying he experienced a similar issue

The UK saw record high temperatures for more than a week, with the highest reaching 104 degrees on July 19. And it seems like the heat was too much for even Samsung smartphones to bear

The UK saw record high temperatures for more than a week, with the highest reaching 104 degrees on July 19. And it seems like the heat was too much for even Samsung smartphones to bear

Once rumors surfaced that Apple’s latest device wasn’t set to be the year’s biggest innovation, Samsung executives ‘pushed suppliers to meet tighter deadlines, despite loads of new features’.

Shortly after the phones were launched and purchased, reports of the handsets catching fire began to surface.

The recent events echo that of the 2016 Samsung Galaxy Note 7 (pictured) that were found to spontaneously exploded and have been found fault of starting at least 112 fires.

The recent events echo that of the 2016 Samsung Galaxy Note 7 (pictured) that were found to spontaneously exploded and have been found fault of starting at least 112 fires.

Just a month after the launch, mobile chief DJ Koh held a press conference in Seoul, South Korea where he announced the recall of 2.5 million Galaxy Note 7 devices that would eventually be replaced with a new and safe Note 7.

Although the firm was praised for its quick thinking, it was also criticized for announcing these plans prior to establishing a strategy on how to gather millions of phones in 10 countries and get each person a replacement.

And a year later, Samsung was hit with a class action lawsuit from at least 1,900 users in South Korea, who wanted compensation to the tune of $822,000.

However, the recall cost the company $5.3 billion and another $19 billion when the company axed the Note 7 altogether just two months after they started exploding.

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